Dell Turns to PC Remote Control to Boost Decline in Customer Satisfaction

(PRWEB) December 7, 2005 - In the wake of declining customer satisfaction, Dell announced on November 15, 2005, that it is testing TechConnect, its latest Web-based tool that enables support reps to remotely control customers’ PCs. In addition to streamlining their support through PC remote control, the company also plans to double the number of their Dell On Call support reps to 2,500 by early 2006, and will add thousands of reps during the year.

Dell set a new paradigm for PC sales with its direct model and went on to become the world’s largest PC company. It has also frequently been found at the top of the list for customer satisfaction. However, failure to make last quarter’s sales quota and the 18 percent drop in stock value (down to $34), are indicative of underlying problems that need to be solved. The problems are also evident in a survey conducted by the University of Michigan which revealed an unparalleled 6.3 percent drop in Dell’s customer satisfaction - down to a score of 74 - and in the 23 percent rise in complaints to the Better Business Bureau in 2004.

Dell has been making a number of changes to reverse these figures and progress is being made. Their recent internal customer surveys show a 35 percent increase in customer satisfaction per John Hamlin, senior vice-president of Dell’s U.S. consumer business. In addition to continuing their work on reducing call transfers and cutting hold time, Dell will also be introducing new memberships that give varying levels of service.

It is no surprise that Dell is implementing PC remote control as a solution. Not only did the recent PC Magazine customer satisfaction survey reveal that PC remote control is an area of growing customer satisfaction, TechRepublic’s Real World Guide: Improving Help Desk Service Levels advises that the ratio of support rep staff to end user increases by a whopping 1:15 when using PC remote control products. Surveys conducted by NetworkStreaming, the Mississippi start-up that pioneered the appliance model for remote support, revealed that support reps can reduce the time on each support session by 50 percent, and also significantly reduce the need to escalate issues - a problem Dell has been striving to resolve. Feedback on Dell’s TechConnect has also been positive. Of the customers who have piloted the product, 99 percent recommend it for future troubleshooting sessions.

Despite these difficulties, Dell is still the leader. Market share has gone from 28.2 percent a year ago to 28.8 percent of the U.S. consumer market, and Dell intends to keep it on the rise.

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